Windows 2000

Windows 2000 is an operating system for use on both client and server computers. It was produced by Microsoft and released to manufacturing on December 15, 1999 and launched to retail on February 17, 2000. It is the successor to Windows NT 4.0, and is the last version of Microsoft Windows to display the "Windows NT" designation. It is succeeded by Windows XP (released in October 2001) and Windows Server 2003 (released in April 2003). During development, Windows 2000 was known as Windows NT 5.0.

Four editions of Windows 2000 were released: Professional, Server, Advanced Server, and Datacenter Server; the latter was both released to manufacturing and launched months after the other editions. While each edition of Windows 2000 was targeted at a different market, they shared a core set of features, including many system utilities such as the Microsoft Management Console and standard system administration applications.

Support for people with disabilities was improved over Windows NT 4.0 with a number of new assistive technologies, and Microsoft increased support for different languages and locale information.

All versions of the operating system support NTFS 3.0, Encrypting File System, as well as basic and dynamic disk storage. The Windows 2000 Server family has additional features, including the ability to provide Active Directory services (a hierarchical framework of resources), Distributed File System (a file system that supports sharing of files) and fault-redundant storage volumes. Windows 2000 can be installed through either a manual or unattended installation. Unattended installations rely on the use of answer files to fill in installation information, and can be performed through a bootable CD using Microsoft Systems Management Server, by the System Preparation Tool.

Microsoft marketed Windows 2000 as the most secure Windows version ever at the time; however, it became the target of a number of high-profile virus attacks such as Code Red and Nimda. For ten years after its release, it continued to receive patches for security vulnerabilities nearly every month until reaching the end of its lifecycle on July 13, 2010.

 

Card Bus USB 2.0 4 port PCMCIA PC Card Adapter Power

Due to the fact there were a lot of generic PCMCIA (PC CARD) to USB 2.0 devices on the market drivers can be a little hard to find. At the bottom of the page are a range of drivers you can try to install the adapter on an older operating system.

Intel 82371SB PCI to USB Universal Host Controller Driver

This driver for the Intel 82371SB PCI to USB Universal Host Controller Driver is required for many USB disk drive devices like the Iomega Zip drives and other devices. The driver does support up to Windows XP and Server 2003 but later operating systems should not need to have a driver installed as it is included. Install this driver with extreme caution as it is a base system driver. As always backup your data before installation.

Iomega Zip 100/250/750 Drivers (scsi/parallel/usb/ide)

Iomega Zip drives were the choice for expanded external storage in the 90’s and early 2000 because alternatives were 1.44MB floppy disks that were becoming a problem due to the nature of files and multimedia need much more space. CD writers were available at the time but were slow and un-reliable at times. Also Zip drives were much cheaper to purchase, however the disks for the Zip drivers were expensive compared to CDRW discs. Storage is 100MB, 250MB & 750MB hence the 3 models that have each number. New models are backwards compatible with smaller size disks.

Nvidia Drivers for Windows 2000/XP

Even though Windows NT 4.0 was mainly on business and school systems, you could still play all those 3D FPS games with a good graphics card. Not as common as gaming on Windows 95 but some people *cough* *cough* would play those games at work, and Windows NT 4.0 with all the service packs installed was pretty darn good and was the same base code as Windows 2000 and XP.

3Dfx Voodoo 5 Drivers

Voodoo 5 5000

The unreleased Voodoo 5 5000 was to be similar to the 5500 but with half of the RAM capacity (32 MB total).

Voodoo 5 5500

The Voodoo 5 5500 comes in three flavors: a universal AGP version (AGP 1/2x, prototypes were made with AGP4x-interface) with full sideband support, PCI, and the Mac Edition, which is only available for PCI, though could run in 66 MHz PCI slots. The Mac Edition has a DVI- and a VGA-A-out, the other versions just have one VGA-out.

3Dfx Voodoo 2 Drivers

In 1998, 3dfx released Voodoo's successor, the popular Voodoo2. The Voodoo2 was architecturally similar, but the basic board configuration added a second texturing unit, allowing two textures to be drawn in a single pass.

3Dfx Voodoo 1 Drivers

The 3Dfx Voodoo 1 was one of the first 3D based graphics card that was affordable for home-based computer systems. By 1996 there was over 100 PC (Windows/DOS) games titles that supported the Voodoo chip sets. Most old Voodoo graphics cards should work with newer versions of Windows. In the case of DOS and Windows 95, XP etc the drivers are below.

Linksys Wireless-G PCI Adapter WMP54G

The Linksys Wireless-G PCI Adapter installs in most desktops and lets you put
your computer almost anywhere in the building, without the cost and hassle of
running network cables. Now you don't have to drill holes in your walls and
climb through the attic or cellar to get connected to the network. Once you're
connected, you can keep in touch with your e-mail, access the Internet, use
instant messaging to chat with friends, and share files and other resources such
as printers and network storage with other computers on the network.